The psychology of Green…

No one can argue that color doesn’t have meaning. Color is more than accent piece, wall coating, or throw pillow; it has a profound effect on our lives. Color can bring about a variety of emotions, affect our moods, and influence our behaviors.

Color has different meanings and values in different cultures around the world. Even in similar Western Societies, the significance of certain colors changes.  In the United States, researchers have determined that there is a consensus across the country on what effect individual colors have on the emotions, moods, and behaviors of individuals.

We covered the color Blue, Pink, and Grey in the past color psychology posts. This week the color is Green.

Green occupies more space in the spectrum visible to the human eye than most colors, and is second only to blue as a favorite color.

Green is the pervasive color in the natural world, making it an ideal backdrop in interior design because we are so used to seeing it everywhere.

The natural greens, from forest to lime, are seen as tranquil and refreshing, with a natural balance of cool and warm undertones.

Green is considered the color of peace and ecology. Green also represents tranquility, good luck, health, and jealousy.

Green is used worldwide to represent safety.

Green visually recedes, helping to make a small space appear larger.

Green is thought to relieve stress and help heal. It is also mentally and physically relaxing. It alleviates depression, nervousness, and anxiety. It offers a sense of renew, self-control, and harmony. Green is often used in decorating for these reasons.

Despite all its fabulous qualities, there is an “institutional” side to green, associated with illness and government-issued green cards, that conjures up negative emotions, as do the “slimy” or “bilious” greens.

 Variations of the Color Green:

Pale green: As the color of new growth on plants, it indicates immaturity, youthfulness and inexperience. It allows us to see things from a new perspective, to make a fresh start.

Emerald green: This is an inspiring and uplifting color suggesting abundance and wealth in all its forms, from material well-being, to emotional well-being to creative ideas.

Jade green: The color of trust and confidentiality, tact and diplomacy, jade green indicates a generosity of spirit, giving without expecting anything in return. It increases worldly wisdom and understanding, assisting in the search for enlightenment.

Lime green: Lime green inspires youthfulness, naivety and playfulness; it is liked the most by younger people. It creates a feeling of anticipation, and helps to clear the mind of negativity.

Dark green: There is a degree of resentment in dark green. Often used by wealthy businessmen, ambitious and always striving for more wealth, dark green signifies greed and selfish desire.

Aqua: Aqua calms the spirit, offering protection and healing for the emotions.

Olive green: Although the traditional color for peace, ‘offering an olive branch’, the color olive suggests deceit and treachery, blaming others for its problems. However there is also a strength of character with it that can overcome adversity to develop an understanding and caring of the feelings of others.

Yellow green: This color green suggests cowardice, conflict and fear.

Grass green: Grass green is the color of money. It is self-confident and secure, natural and healthy, occurring in abundance in nature.

 

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3 thoughts on “The psychology of Green…

  1. Green is my favorite color. I love nearly every shade of it. The green chandelier pictured in the emerald room, I think ,is fabulous. Gray is really starting to grow on me though. Painted my kitchen a pale gray several years ago and love it. I’m currently trying to find a color for my living room. I love color, but when it comes to paint, I’m often lost.

  2. Pingback: The Psychology of Purple… |

  3. Pingback: The Psychology of Purple… |

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